September 17th, Tuesday

Graziella Lonardi Buontempo room

Library room

Corner room

14:00-16:30

Workshop 1: Do we trust Big Data-based policy making? Workshop 2: Gendering ICT Workshop 3: Women in Cyber – a Manifesto for TODAY

September 18th, Wednesday

Graziella Lonardi Buontempo room

Library room

Corner room

11:00-12:30

Workshop 4: Data science for society (part 1) Workshop 5: Using Lego® Serious Play® to explore how to build- up positive ICT futures Workshop 7: Discovering Artificial Intelligence

12:30-13:30

Poster presentation and lunch break – CORNER ROOM

13:30-15:00

Workshop 4: Data science for society (part 2) Workshop 6: So you believe your software is reliable… Workshop 8: Microservices: An exploration with GameOn

Workshop details

Workshop 1: Do we trust Big Data-based policy making?

When: September 17th, Tuesday, h 14:00-16.30

Where: Corner room

Organizers:  Monica Scannapieco, ISTAT, Italy (scannapi@istat.it)

Short description:

Policy making is nowadays relying more and more on new data sources and in particular on Big Data. In additional to traditional human-centered policy making, new more automated mechanisms are progressively emerging, where policies arise in a data-driven way or, even more ambitiously, from collaborative environments (e.g. home automation in smart houses).

However, for the purpose of decision making, the quality of available data plays a fundamental role together with the ability of extracting meaningful information from the heap.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

This workshop aims to shed some insight about dealing with Big Data in a ‘reliable’ way, i.e. having quality and meaningfulness of extracted information as targets.

Questions addressed include:

  • Do Big Data have an irreplaceable role for decision-making nowadays? Why?
  • How to assess and document the quality of Big Data-based analyses?
  • Which are the open challenges that you rate as extremely relevant to be solved in the next future to have ‘reliable’ Big Data-based analyses?

Program:

Time

Activity

Speakers

 14:00-15:15 Invited Speech Edoardo Calia, LinksFoundation
15:15-16:30 Panel Panelists:

Sihem Amer-Yahia, Laboratoire d’Informatique de Grenoble

Maria Claudia Bodino, Digital Transformation Team of Italian Government

Antonino Virgillito, Italian Revenue Agency

Moderator:

Monica Scannapieco, Italian National Institute of Statistics


Workshop 2: Gendering ICT

When: September 17th, Tuesday, h  14:00-16:30

Where: Library room

Organizers: Prof. Silvana Badaloni, University of Padova, Italy (silvana.badaloni@unipd.it);

Prof. Francesca A. Lisi, University of Bari, Italy (francesca.lisi@uniba.it);

Prof. Lorenza Perini, University of Padova, Italy (lorenza.perini@unipd.it)

Short description:

The celebration of women in ICT cannot occur without facing the problem of the under-representation of women in Computing. As recently published in ACM Communications, women earned 28.5%, 25.1%, and 18.1% of all bachelor-level computer science degrees in US in 1995, 2004, and 2014, respectively. These low percentages are confirmed by data gathered in all European countries. In particular in Italy, in Academic Year 2017/2018 the presence of women in Bachelors in Computer Engineering is 21,01% and in Computer Science is 12,23% while in Master CE is 14,83% and in Master CS is 16,32%, thus witnessing a strong under-representation of women and a very low access to career progression.

Many studies have dealt with this problem that is common to the entire area of STEM, by trying to understand which is the role of stereotypes and of images seen in the media influencing the young women in the access to ICT studies. A lot of women’s associations and networks (e.g. NERD, Women in Technology, ProjectCSGIRLS, etc) have promoted projects to remove these beliefs and attract young women into STEM and particularly into CS and CE, through examples, statistics, focused projects, and media content analysis.

Gendering ICT does not only imply to change the numbers of women in CS/CE but also to address the problem of including the gender dimension in the contents of CS/CE. How a new gendered Science can be developed by taking into account the gender dimension? How can we formulate new scientific questions while having the awareness that another Science is possible? In this context it is necessary to analyze if algorithms and tools are neutral from the gender point of view. This is particularly important in the fields of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Indeed recent studies in these fields show that, for instance, Machine Learning algorithms can upload the gender bias diffused in the society. So we speak of Biased ML. The problem arises since little attention is paid to how data are collected, processed and organized.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

  • Analyzing the most common stereotypes and gender-clichéd images about women in ICT causing the existing gender gap
  • Comparing the different approaches to promote the presence of women, and particularly of young women, in ICT education and research and stimulating an effective networking among projects
  • Exploring new communication languages for the debate around the gender bias in CS/CE, and the subsequent ethical issues it poses
  • Developing gendered innovation in CS/CE, with new general questions to take into account a gender point of view
  • Facing the problem of designing algorithmic methodologies that do not subsume social bias about sex, gender and race.

Program:

The duration of the Workshop is 2:30 h. In the first part the panel with interventions from the organizers and from the audience will describe the different aspects of the WS concept followed by a Scientific Café on the points listed above to promote a wider discussion among participants on how to reach the intended goals. A final report will close the WS.

Time

Activity

Outcome

 14:00-15:30 Panel with:

Lorenza Perini, University of Padova

Silvana Badaloni, University of Padova

Francesca Alessandra Lisi, University of Bari

Gunay Kazimzade, Technical University of Berlin

Interventions from the audience

Presentations of data, results, policies, initiatives and experiment about gender issues in ICT
15:30-16:00 Scientific Café (parallel) Informal discussion with attendees on different aspects
 16:00-16:30 Wrap-up discussion (plenary) Final report

Workshop 3: Women in Cybersecurity: A manifesto for TODAY

When: September 17th, Tuesday, h 14:00-16:30

Where: Graziella Lonardi Buontempo room

Organizers: Prof. Barbara Carminati, University of Insubria, Italy (barbara.carminati@uninsubria.it);  Felicia Cutas, EIT Digital, Brussels, Belgium, (felicia.cutas@eitdigital.eu); Prof. Elena Ferrari, University of Insubria, Italy (elena.ferrari@uninsubria.it)

Short description:

To date women represent only 24% of the workforce in the cybersecurity domain. The figure increased over the years, but it is still far from reflecting a balanced representation of both genders.Taking into account the current circumstances, the workshop aims to provide a forum for engaging with stakeholders from different areas of cybersecurity to agree on a common plan of actions in view of bridging the gender gap by increasing the number of women in cybersecurity. Representatives of the cybersecurity industry, policy, education, research, entrepreneurship and investment areas are invited to join the workshop and bring their contribution to the discussion with real cases and innovative ideas that could incentivize, especially, young professionals to join the domain of cybersecurity.

WomENcourage offers the right platform for validating and launching the “Women in Cyber – a Manifesto for TODAY” as its “raison d’être” is in line with the workshop objectives and it brings together all the stakeholders targeted by the Manifesto.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

The workshop is intended to provide a supportive environment to fertilise the collaboration among relevant stakeholders, aiming to develop a common vision to support women engagement in the cybersecurity area and better coordinate the work across different communities. Particular emphasis will be put on the potential of cybersecurity with respect to the provisioning of new job opportunities in the market, also, on the basis of the vertical application domains involved.

The expected workshop outcome is the launch of the “Women in Cyber – a Manifesto for TODAY”. The organizers are currently working on a preliminary version of the Manifesto, that will be ready by the time of the workshop and will be used as a Manifesto skeleton, containing objectives and actions. It is intended that the preliminary version of the manifesto will be subject to further revisions during the workshop discussions. To this end, the workshop format is designed to promote a lively discussion among participants to collect their feedback and to converge on the final version of the Manifesto, that will be officially launched at the end of the workshop.

Program: available here


Workshop 4: Data Science for Society

When: September 18th, Wednesday, h 11:00-12:30  (part I) 13.30-15:00 (part II)

Where: Graziella Lonardi Buontempo room

Organizers: Dr. Letizia Milli, University of Pisa & CNR Pisa ISTI KDDLab , Italy (milli@di.unipi.it); Michela Natilli University of Pisa & CNR Pisa ISTI KDDLab, Italy (michela.natilli@di.unipi.it); Laura Pollacci, University of Pisa & CNR Pisa ISTI KDDLab, Italy (laura.pollacci@di.unipi.it); Dr. Francesca Pratesi, University of Pisa & CNR Pisa ISTI KDDLab, Italy (pratesi@di.unipi.it)

Short description:

The big data arising from the digital breadcrumbs of human activities promise to let us scrutinize the ground truth of individual and collective behaviour at an unprecedented detail and scale.  Big data, combined with social data mining, i.e., adequate means for accessing big data and extracting useful knowledge from them provide a chance to understand the complexity of our contemporary, globally-interconnected society: e.g., disentangling urban sustainability and resilience, societal well-being and its multiple facets, the unequal distribution of resources and opportunities, the “ecological” problems of our information system, such as polarization and misinformation, the dynamics and economic drivers behind human migration.

This workshop will focus on examples of social mining and big data research answering challenging questions in different domains that have been developed within the project SoBigData.

On line debates:

i) is there any consequence in opinion formation and diffusion due to the algorithm bias present in social media platforms? ;

ii) using Twitter as a proxy of our society, to monitor opinions about politicians, looking at abuse broken down by parties and gender.

Migration: discussions about the refugee crisis and the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum. These complex and contended topics can be analyzed monitoring online social networks like Twitter. Discussion about the possibility to infer immigrants’ rate by using Twitter data and by exploiting Sentiment Analysis techniques.

City of Citizens:  how to invest in car sharing, autonomous drive and electric mobility, as starting point for enabling smart city solutions.

On top of this, a fundamental point that often is forgotten regards ethics and its implication. In particular, we want to describe some of challenging methodologies and solutions to privacy analysis and explainability of algorithms .

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

Nowadays, we socialize and search for information online, we sell and buy products and services thought web platforms, we carry on our mobile phone with us everywhere. Thanks to these digital breadcrumbs and the data science that allows us to make analysis, we are able to observe and understand complex social phenomena and take decisions that impact on our society. Data science is also changing the way scientific research is performed.

The purpose of this workshop is to encourage the research that will lead to the advancement of the social science. In particular, we will provide an overview of different methodologies and applications in several contexts: five successful female researchers will introduce their work and describe their experience in the respective fields.

Program:

Time

Activity

Outcome

 11:00-11:10 Welcome and Overview of the Workshop Introduction to the workshop: SoBigData, an ecosystem for Social Mining Research
11:10-11:35 Invited talk on “Migration” (Cristina I. Muntean) Presentation of studies on perception about immigrants and Brexit.
11:35-12:05 Invited talk on “On line debates” (Diana Maynard) Description of the use of Twitter to monitor opinions of politicians, showing an increment over the time of abuse directed at women and those not in the currently governing party.
12:05-12:30 Invited talk on “On line debates” (Alina Sirbu) Description of the role of social networks and online media in shaping public debate and the problems related to algorithmic bias that is believed to enhance fragmentation and polarization of the societal debate.
13:30-13:55 Invited talk on “Mitigation” (Alina Sirbu) Description of the joint usage of Twitter and Sentiment Analysis to now-cast immigrants’ rates in Italy and United Kingdom.
13:55-14:20 Invited talk on “City of Citizens” (Chiara Boldrini) Introducing car sharing possibilities but also major obstacles in the demand. We discuss which sociodemographic and urban activity indicators are associated with variations in car sharing request.
14:20-15:00 Invited talk on “Data Science & Ethics” (Fosca Giannotti) Discussion on the urgent open challenge of how to construct meaningful explanations of black box and opaque AI/ML systems.

Workshop 5: Workshop: Using Lego® Serious Play® to explore how to build- up positive ICT futures

When: September 18th, Wednesday, h 11:00-12:30

Where: Library room

Organizer: Miss Gosia Plotka, Polish-Japanese Academy of Information Technology, Gdansk and De Montfort University, Leicester (mplotka@pjwstk.edu.pl)

Short description:

ICT may drive societal change by empowering people from the disadvantaged backgrounds and those who are struggling with any difficulties for example in learning to give them choice they would not normally have or improve their quality of life. To achieve that any technical innovation needs to be introduced with care and consideration of its potential social and ethical pitfalls such as privacy and individual’s rights breaches, copyright, computer abuse, digital citizenship and exclusion or technology addictions. Therefore, it is of great import to pay attention to ICT education, of both, those who are going to take an active part in technological development – the futures computer scientist and members of the society who are going to use it. In the Information Age ICT becomes a type of profession that requires life-long learning skills what has been recognised in many researchers also the one conducted by the workshop proposer.

To face some of the challenges within the education, meet a diversity of students’ needs and make it more effective a variety of active learning tools could be exploited. Lego® Serious Play® (LSP®) is a method popularized in 2010 by the Lego Group to support communication and problem-solving. It has been recognised that “talking and thinking with hands” is a powerful way of overcoming some barriers with expressing an opinion and reflecting on own work or discussed topic. LSP® can be used as an alternative tool to ideate (brainstorm) and conceptualise the outcome for example during meetings or focus groups but also as a way to develop perspective thinking that helps to embrace diversity and “facilitates depersonalization to increase the sense of security in the narrative process and to facilitate reframing personal experience”.

This will be a 90mins hands-on workshop where the participant will have a chance not just to come across but also practice the Lego® Serious Play® method while we will be exploring possibilities of education at the service of building-up positive ICT futures and inclusive society in the Information Age.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

Intended goals: open up discussion on possibilities of education in building-up positive ICT futures and inclusive society in the Information Age through LEGO®

Outcomes:

  • To introduce Lego® Serious Play® method as a tool supporting active learning
  • To provide experience in using LSP® to explore possibilities of education in building-up positive ICT futures and inclusive society in the Information Age
  • To familiarise with the metaphor as a tool to overcome barriers with sharing ideas and speaking in a forum
  • To learn how to generate and synthesise ideas with the use of LSP® method
  • To bring forth dialogue about some important concepts around of education at the service of building-up positive ICT futures and inclusive society

Program:

This hands-on workshop aims at providing an experience with the LSP® method by practising it, with a minimal introduction from the facilitator:

Time

Activity

Outcome

11:00-11:05 Introduction (facilitator) Explain the goal and rules
11:05-11:10 Introduction to the LSP® (facilitator) Introduce LSP® method as a tool to generate, analyse and discuss complex ideas with a group
11:10-11:15 Warming up: building the bridge (participants) Familiarise with the bricks through a simple exercise
11:15-11:20 Introduction to metaphor (facilitator) Understand the concept of metaphor as a way to discuss complex or troublesome ideas
11:20-11:30 Picking the model of animal and reflecting on the choice (participants) Reflect on the way how each of the participants perceives themselves within the discussed topic
11:30-11:40 Building individual models (participants after a short introduction and setting up the question – the same for each participant) Create a model that for each of the participants represents an answer to the question asked by the facilitator so is a form or set of ideas generated
11:40-11:50 Individual to share (participants) Share a story around the built model to rest of the group following the ground rules introduced at the beginning
11:50-12:00 Connecting individual models (participants after a short introduction) Identify, connect and label common areas (concepts)
12:00-12:20 Discussing the outcomes (everybody) Reflect on findings and discuss concepts around possibilities of ICT education
12:20-12:25 Wrapping up: final comments on the method (everybody) Summarise and comment on the method and its potential use
12:25-12:30 Evaluation and feedback (everybody) Comment on the workshop and its outcome

Workshop 6: So you believe your software is reliable

When: September 18th, Wednesday, h 13:30-15:00

Where: Library room

Organizers:  Elisabetta Napolitano, Google (elisabettan@google.com); Sparky, Google, (sparky@google.com); Ruth King, Google (ruthking@google.com)

Short description:

How does system reliability relate to UX? This workshop will introduce you to thinking about user expectations to help you design software with a reliable user experience. We introduce the concepts of metrics and monitoring to quantify user happiness.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

People consider user expectations when building a service and think about
how to measure / monitor user experience.

Program:

Time

Activity

Outcome

13:30-13:40 Introduction Get to know presenters and what is SRE
13:40-13:50 Intro UX journeys Understand what is a UX journey
13:50-14:00 UX journey activity (groups of 5) Know how to define UX journeys for a product
14:00-14:10 Intro SLIs Understand what is a Service Level Indicator and how these can be measured/monitored
14:10-14:25 SLI activity (groups of 5) Know how to define an SLI for a product and how to measure/monitor these
14:25-14:35 Intro SLOs Understand what is a Service Level Objective and why it’s a good idea
14:35-14:45 SLO activity (groups of 5) Know how to define SLOs for a product
14:45-15:00 Conclusion/Questions Curious about other ways data monitoring and analytics could be used.

Workshop 7: Discovering Artificial Intelligence

When: September 18th, Wednesday, h 11:00-12:30

Where: Corner room

Organizers:  Marco Siciliano, Accenture Digital, Senior Manager (marco.siciliano@accenture.com), Rosalinda Facchin, Accenture Analyst (rosalinda.facchin@accenture.com)

Short description:

How much do you know about Artificial Intelligence?

During the workshop Accenture professionals will drive you in discovering more on how:

  • Artificial intelligence will transform the relationship between people and technology, charging our creativity and skills.
  • The future of Artificial Intelligence promises a new era of disruption and productivity, where human ingenuity is enhanced by speed and precision.

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

We will be able to share examples of Artificial Intelligence through demos and case studies

Program:

Time

Activity

Outcome

 11:00-11:30 Welcome What is AI?
11:30-12:00 Discovering Artificial Intelligence Deep dive on how AI can help humans in working activities
12:00-12:30 How to apply AI Demos on AI:

  • Chatbot
  • Alexa
  • Digital Concierge (face recognition)
  • ARM Digital Signage Platform
  • Stock-Price prediction
  • Shoppy

Workshop 8: Microservices: an explanation with Game on

When: September 18th, Wednesday, h 13:30-15:00

Where: Corner room

Organizers:  Katherine Stanley, IBM UK Ltd. (katheris@uk.ibm.com); Gantigmaa Selenge, IBM UK Ltd. (gselenge@uk.ibm.com); Olja Rastic-Dulborough, IBM UK Ltd. (oljarast@uk.ibm.com)

Information for attendees: students need to bring laptops, Basic knowledge of programming required, Knowledge of one of Java, Node, Swift or Scala would be useful

Short description:

Microservices is an application architecture style that allows for creation of complex applications by using small, independent (autonomous), replaceable processes that communicate by using lightweight APIs that do not depend on language. This architecture is ideal for workloads that run on the cloud.

In this workshop, the students play a game to learn key aspects of microservice architectures. This is a quick way to get hands on experience without spending weeks learning the basics and then architecting a microservices application. Instead, students learn by doing.

We think this would be a fun but extremely useful workshop for technical students who are interested in cloud application development and could provide a good technical grounding for their future individual or group projects at university.

Additionally, since there is a GameOn environment available 24/7 on the IBM cloud, students can continue exploring after the end of the conference. The live site can be found here: https://gameontext.org/#/

Intended Goals and Outcomes:

By playing the microservices game, students will gain an understanding of:

  • Key aspects of microservice architectures
  • Some of the benefits of microservices
  • Some of the challenges of microservices
  • Latency, scalability, shared state, caching, service interaction patterns for applications

By the end of the workshop the students will have a running application in IBM cloud that is registered with GameOn. Any GameOn players will be able to see the new room in the live GameOn site, and interact with it.

Program:

Time

Activity

Outcome

13:30-13:40 Presentation Introduction talk microservices and GameOn game
13:40-13:50 Game play Understanding how GameOn works
13:50-14:20 Create a room Build an application that is a room in GameOn
14:20-14:35 Deploy the room to IBM Cloud Have a room running in the live GameOn site
14:35-14:50 Add new elements to the game Update the application in IBM Cloud
14:50-15:00 Wrap up Close and questions